Saturday, April 4, 2015

BOYCHOIR..... the movie

BEEN  TO  SEE  THE  RECENT  NEW  MOVIE  "BOYCHOIR"  STARING  DUSTIN  HOFFMAN,  AND  OF  COURSE  A  BOYCHOIR.

IF  YOU  LIKE  MUSIC;  IF  YOU  LIKE  CHOIRS;  IF  YOU  LIKE  A  DRAMA;  IF  YOU  LIKE  AN  INSPIRATION;  IF  YOU  LIKE  A  GOOD  ENDING ---

THEN  YOU  WILL  LOVE  THIS  MOVIE!

IT  WILL  NOT  BE  SHOWN  IN  ALL  MOVIE  THEATERS,  BUT  PUT  IT  ON  YOUR  LIST  OF  FAMILY  MOVIES  TO  SEE;  I  CERTAINLY  WILL  BUY  IT  WHEN  IT'S  ON  DVD.

TWO  THUMBS  UP!!

HERE'S  A  LITTLE  ABOUT  DUSTIN  HOFFMAN:


Dustin Hoffman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman - 1968.jpg
Hoffman in 1968
BornDustin Lee Hoffman
August 8, 1937 (age 77)
Los AngelesCalifornia, U.S.
OccupationActor
Years active1960–present
Spouse(s)Anne Byrne (1969–80)
Lisa Hoffman
(1980–present)
Children6 including Jake Hoffman
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from the BBC programme Desert Island Discs, December 2, 2012.[1]

Dustin Lee Hoffman[2] (born August 8, 1937) is an American actor with a career in film, television, and theatre since 1960. He has been known for his versatile portrayals of antiheroes and vulnerable characters.[3]
He first drew critical praise for starring in the play Eh?, for which he won a Theatre World Award and a Drama Desk Award. This was soon followed by his breakthrough 1967 film role as Benjamin Braddock, the title character in The Graduate. Since then, Hoffman's career has largely been focused on cinema, with sporadic returns to television and the stage. 
Hoffman has been nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning two (for his performances in Kramer vs. Kramer and Rain Man), thirteen Golden Globes, winning six (including an honorary one) and has won four BAFTAs, three Drama Desk Awards, a Genie Award, and an Emmy Award. Hoffman received the AFI Life Achievement Award in 1999, and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012.........


Early life
[edit]

Hoffman was born on August 8, 1937 in Los Angeles,[2] the second son of Lillian (née Gold) and Harry Hoffman. His father worked as a prop supervisor (set decorator) atColumbia Pictures before becoming a furniture salesman.[4] Hoffman was named after stage and silent screen actor Dustin Farnum. His older brother, Ronald, is a lawyer and economist. Hoffman is Jewish, from anAshkenazi family of immigrants from Ukraine and Iași (Romania).[5][6] His upbringing was non-religious; he has said, "I don’t have any memory of celebrating holidays growing up that were Jewish", and that he had "realized" he was Jewish at around age 10.[7][8][9] He graduated from Los Angeles High School in 1955 and enrolled at Santa Monica College with the intention of studying medicine. Hoffman left after a year to join thePasadena Playhouse,[10] although when he told his family about his career goal, his Aunt Pearl warned him "You can't be an actor. You are not good-looking enough."[11][12] He also took classes at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City.

Early work[edit]

Hoffman initially hoped to become a classical pianist, having studied piano during much of his youth and in college. While at Santa Monica College, he also took an acting class, which he assumed would be easy, and "caught the acting bug." He recalls: "I just was not gifted in music. I did not have an ear."[13] Now an aspiring actor, he spent the next ten years doing odd jobs, being unemployed, and struggling to get any available acting roles.
His first acting role was at the Pasadena Playhouse, alongside future Academy Award-winner, Gene Hackman.[14] After two years there, Hackman headed for New York City, with Hoffman soon following. Hoffman, Hackman and Robert Duvall lived together in the 1960s, all three of them focused on finding acting jobs.[15][16] Hackman remembers, "The idea that any of us would do well in films simply didn't occur to us. We just wanted to work."[13] During this period, Hoffman got occasional television bit parts, including commercials but, needing income, he briefly left acting to teach.

1980s:  TootsieDeath of a SalesmanRain ManFamily Business[edit]

in Death of a Salesman (1985)
In Tootsie (1982), Hoffman portrays Michael Dorsey, a struggling actor who finds himself dressing up as a woman to land a role on a soap opera. His co-star was Jessica Lange.Tootsie earned ten Academy Award nominations, including Hoffman's fifth nomination.
Under direction by Sydney Pollack, Hoffman's role demanded "a steady bombardment of opposites—edgy then funny, romantic then realistic, soft then quivering."[40] To film criticDavid Denby, Hoffman's character "embodies vulnerability and drive in perfect proportion. He has the knack of making everything he does seem perilous, and so audiences feel protective of him and root for him."[41] Hoffman's acting was made more difficult than necessary, however, as he was not given the rehearsal time Pollock promised:
I like to be very prepared, and I feel that the success or failure of a film is many times determined before you start principal photography. I wanted rehearsal very much. I was promised two weeks and was grieved that I didn't get it. We also followed the risky course of starting to shoot with a screenplay that wasn't completed.[42]
In 1984, Hoffman starred as Willy Loman in the Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman[43] He reprised his role in a TV movie of the same name, for which he won the 1985 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor along with a Golden Globe........
Next came director Barry Levinson's Rain Man (1988), where Hoffman starred as an autistic savant, opposite Tom Cruise. Levinson, Hoffman and Cruise worked for two years on the film, and Hoffman's performance gained him his second Academy Award. Behind Hoffman's motivation for doing the film, he has said, "Deep inside, Rain Man is about how autistic we all are." In preparation for the part, Hoffman spent two years befriending autistic people, which included taking them bowling and to fast food restaurants. "It fed my obsession," he has stated.[48]
Hoffman had worked at the New York Psychiatric Institute, affiliated with Columbia University, when he was 21. "It was a great experience for me," he has said. "All my life I had wanted to get inside a prison or a mental hospital. . . . I wanted to get inside where behavior, human behavior, was so exposed. All the things the rest of us were feeling and stopping up were coming out of these people."[29] He used that experience to help him develop the character of Raymond Babbitt, a high-functioning autistic savant, yet a person who critic David Denby described as "a strangely shuttered genius."[49] Hoffman created certain character traits for Raymond. Denby noted: "Hoffman, looking suddenly older and smaller, has developed a small shuffling walk for Raymond, with shoulder bent. His eyes don't make contact with anyone else's, and he flattens his voice to a dry nasal bark."[49]
Rain Man won four Academy Awards, including Best PictureBest Actor in a Leading Role for Hoffman, and Best Director for Barry Levinson. Having worked closely with Hoffman for two years on filming, Levinson offered some opinions about his skill as an actor:
You can't define Dustin Hoffman, because he's unique. He's one of a kind and he's not one character. There is no Dustin Hoffman. He is many, many people. . . . He can do comedy and he can do drama. He has an enormous range, and yet he's still Dustin somewhere in there. He's intelligent and has a great sense of how to connect with people, because he's very interesting. On a day-to-day basis, he's like an actor who's making his first movie, with the enthusiasm and energy to want to make things happen and try things and experiment.[50]............

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